Tikku house by Marco Casagrande

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Photo: © Jenni Gästgivar

Photo: © Nikita Wu

Photo: © Nikita Wu

Photo: © Jenni Gästgivar

Photo: © Jenni Gästgivar

Photo: © Jenni Gästgivar

Photo: © Nikita Wu

Micro-houses and cheap, sustainable alternatives to traditional building materials remain an ever-growing concern in the urban living environment. Around the world, cities are growing in population, but shrinking in area, and it’s happening fast. Marco Casagrande is an architect whose practice is committed to finding sustainable and holistic solutions to architectural problems. We have covered a couple of his projects before: the Ultra Ruina Jungle Retreat and Taitung Ruin Academy.

Tikku is a tiny house, designed by Casagrande for Helsinki Design Week 2017. This piece of work evolves his research into the potential conceptual marriage between architecture and acupuncture. Tikku, or “The Stick” is designed to fit into a standard parking space of 2.5 by 5 meters. The architect describes it as “a needle of urban acupuncture,” puncturing the congested fabric of the city with quiet, peaceful havens. The structure is balanced with a sand-box that serves as the foundation. Cross-laminated timber (CLT), a material that has been gaining popularity, makes up the walls.

Tikku takes advantage of modularity, allowing the owner to choose many potential configurations of rooms. There is no running water, but it is possible to include a dry toilet. These tiny houses are designed to depend upon the surrounding city for entertainment, recreational space, and some amenities, such as a laundry facility. Find out more about Tikku, and Casagrande’s other work, here.