The author

I’m a Graphic Design graduate currently freelancing and studying Web and UX Design. I hold a Bachelor of Design (Major in Communication Design) from Swinburne University of Technology and covered projects across the graphic design umbrella, including Branding and Identity, Photography, Publication, Web and Interface Design. I’m also open to learning new skills, even if they are not directly design related.

My passion for Web and UX design emerged while studying at Swinburne, when I was designing a real estate website on a responsive framework for first home buyers. It was recognised as the top three in the subject by the Unit Convenor. Before that I also had my graphic design project, Design for Open Space, shortlisted for the Good For Design Competition at Swinburne and was featured as part of Melbourne International Design Week in 2015.

When I’m not busy designing, I enjoy writing, reading, visiting art and design exhibitions and advocating for those with Autism.

Project media

Poster 01
Poster 01
Poster 02
Poster 02
Poster 03
Poster 03
Poster 04
Poster 04
Poster 05
Poster 05
Poster 06
Poster 06
Poster 07
Poster 07
Poster 08
Poster 08
Poster 09
Poster 09
Poster 10
Poster 10
Share

Comments

comments powered by Disqus

Project details

Overview

The Different, Not Defective Exhibition, held at the TooT Artspace in St. Kilda from 13-30 June 2019 seeks to effect social change by raising awareness of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Autism Spectrum is a lifelong developmental disorder characterised by difficulty in socialising, forming relationships and understanding verbal and non-verbal and communication (e.g. body language). Those with Autism experience discrimination and exclusion as they are often perceived as being indifferent, antisocial or lacking empathy. They are often ostracised from society and struggle to find employment.

The numbers of those diagnosed with Autism has increased dramatically in recent years. Being a graphic artist and designer on the Autism Spectrum, I believe it is becoming increasingly necessary to further educate society about Autism, its idiosyncrasies and promote social inclusion and acceptance of neurodiversity.

Share